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    For the first time in history, four generations find themselves working together: Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials and Generation Z. It is not always easy…

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    Different generations are born and grow up in completely different historical contexts. Each has its own values and makes its own individual choices.

    People of very different ages do not always readily communicate and cooperate. Our advice and guidance in this area highlights these gaps in understanding and seeks proactive remedies.

    Reciprocal mentoring projects bring together different age groups to foster greater mutual awareness of the discrete motivations, expectations, needs and working practices of the generations.

    • Studies have shown that young people find it difficult to remain “engaged” in projects with a long-term perspective.
    • Seniors have to continue working well beyond the age of previous generations, and therefore need to find a way of maintaining their motivation.
    — FOCUS

    Example

    Reciprocal Mentoring (RM): A programme of intergenerational dialogue

    Wise Growth developed and for several years has been conducting a “Dialogue between Generations” on behalf of a consumer goods company.

    The programme, which unfolds over a period of 3-4 months, is structured to include up to ten pairs of employees, and entails alternating group work and directed conversations between the pairs.
    Compared to simple mentoring, RM opens up opportunities for mutual rather than one-way learning as it enables people from different generations to act both as mentors and as mentees.

    Unlike other RM projects, Wise Growth’s focuses not only on professional skills and new technologies but also on values and on individuals’ discrete personal experiences of work.